The Marijuana Policy Initiative

Don't Commercialize Marijuana.

A volunteer non-partisan coalition of people from across the US and Canada who have come to understand the negative local-to-global public health and safety implications of an organized, legal, freely-traded, commercialized and industrialized marijuana market.

Teens Tackle 4/20 Tokers with Anti-Marijuana Message

From left, Surrey teens Jordan Smith with twins Connor and Duncan Fesenmaier at the Vancouver Art Gallery on April 20. The high school students were protesting the use and legalization or marijuana. (Photos: AMY REID) - See more at: http://www.thenownewspaper.com/bud-busters-surrey-teens-take-on-the-tokers-at-420-rally-in-vancouver-1.1831521#sthash.wK5QuL33.dpuf

From left, Surrey teens Jordan Smith with twins Connor and Duncan Fesenmaier at the Vancouver Art Gallery on April 20. The high school students were protesting the use and legalization or marijuana. (Photos: AMY REID)

As most of us simply watched marijuana’s “holiday” from our TVs or windows last Monday, a couple of SAM Canada youth decided to take back 4-20-15 for themselves.

Meet Connor and Duncan Fesenmaier, twin brothers active in SAM Canada, and their friend Jordan Smith.

They’re regular high school kids living in Vancouver, Canada who didn’t intend to make national headlines by wearing an anti-pot t-shirt to school.

But they did.

School officials, worried the shirts might actually encourage marijuana use, hauled the boys into the vice-principal’s office and asked politely if they would change their shirts at once.

Connor, Duncan, and Jordan all declined (politely of course).

And in true SAM fashion, they didn’t let up.

“(Students) tend to use it and say ‘Hey man, it’s only medicine, what’s the worst it can do? And that is a terrible thing for a kid to be confused with. I see kids walking around the school with marijuana paraphernalia. Shirts with marijuana leaves on them, backpacks with marijuana leaves on them, cellphone cases with marijuana leaves on them. And I’ve never seen those kids have their items confiscated or asked to remove or replace them with something else.”

That episode would’ve probably been enough for most of us.

But Connor, Duncan, and Jordan were just getting started.

They decided to protest the “smoke-out” on 4/20. Walking straight into the crowd with gas masks and scientific information, they even confronted the Prince of Pot, Marc Emery (look him up).

“Are you ready for some abuse?” asked a Vancouver policeman.

The students kept going, educating both smokers and passersby about the health dangers of chronic marijuana use.

How’s that for a 4/20 story?