The Marijuana Policy Initiative

Don't Commercialize Marijuana.

A volunteer non-partisan coalition of people from across the US and Canada who have come to understand the negative local-to-global public health and safety implications of an organized, legal, freely-traded, commercialized and industrialized marijuana market.

Diversion to Non-Marijuana States is Pot Shop Business Plan

Pot shops plan over border business

Marijuana diversion and trafficking are among the eight listed violations that the Justice Department say they’ll enforce. Apparently this is no deterrent to pot dealers.

It is one thing to have our neighboring states create marijuana chaos for themselves, but exporting it over the border to states that have the good sense not to surrender to the drug culture is despicable. Law enforcement, drug education and prevention people, and government officials take note.

Here are two articles that were published recently. This information should be very disturbing to anyone in our states who cares about marijuana and substance abuse.

AG Holder recently unveiled a list of eight marijuana violations the Justice Department will enforce.  They include:

  • The distribution of marijuana to minors.
  • Directing revenue from marijuana sales to gangs and cartels.
  • Diverting marijuana from states where it is legal to other states where there are no laws allowing for marijuana use.
  • Using legal sales as cover for trafficking operations.
  • Using violence and or firearms in marijuana cultivation and distribution.
  • Driving under the influence of marijuana.
  • Growing marijuana on public lands.
  • Possessing marijuana or using on federal property.

The intent of the following “entrepreneurs” is clearly diversion and trafficking. They will join other traffickers in Colorado with similar plans for Oklahoma. Your state next.

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Some of the most popular locations for Eastern Washington’s new pot entrepreneurs are close to the Idaho border.

Spokesman-Review May 5, 2014 8:33 a.m.

Three Spokane County applicants receiving the green light by the Washington Liquor Control Board to finish the licensing process plan to open a store at the same East Trent Avenue location in Newman Lake, just a mile and a half from the border.

Manpreet Singh of Hi-Star Corp., who wants to open one of those stores, said he picked the small shopping area in Newman Lake for two reasons. One is he owns a gas station nearby.

The other? “It’s close to the border,” Singh said. That could mean an expanded customer base from Idaho, he said.

Recreational marijuana isn’t legal in the Gem State, so Idaho customers would be taking a risk carrying it back across the border. They’d have to consume it somewhere in Washington, in private. Driving back under the influence would also be a problem.

Also receiving a slot through the lottery for suites at the same address in the 25000 block of East Trent are NXNW Retail and Urban Top Shelf. The licensing process has a ways to go, and any of the applicants could drop out or switch to a different location without losing their slot, said Mikhail Carpenter, a spokesman for the liquor board.

Singh said having three marijuana stores in the same area might be tough for business. He has scoped out another spot in the Spokane Valley, but it’s not as good. Among other things, it’s at least 15 miles from the border.

Joseph Rammell received the OK to proceed with his application to open Mary Jane’s Weed in Newport. It would be less than 1,000 feet from Oldtown, Idaho, a short walk along residential streets. But only if Newport drops its moratorium on marijuana businesses within its city limits. If not, “we’re looking at a couple of alternate locations” outside of town, he said.

Several cities and counties have moratoria, but that didn’t stop the board from giving the go-ahead to Rammell or to Kelly Jackson, one of two Asotin County applicants selected in Friday’s lottery.

Jackson plans to open his Canna4Life store on Clarkston’s Sixth Street, which is less than a mile from the bridge separating the two states. The closeness to Idaho was one reason he picked the spot, although only a few buildings in the city met the state’s qualifications of being at least 1,000 feet from schools, playgrounds and other places meant mainly for children.

Jackson said his lifelong asthma was cured about 20 months ago by medical marijuana and he would like someday to carry some medical products as well. Under current law, state-licensed stores can only sell the heavily regulated and taxed recreational marijuana, but with medical marijuana also illegal in Idaho, that state’s residents might have a hard time getting the doctor’s recommendation to buy from a Washington dispensary.

The Clarkston City Council will revisit its moratorium later this year. Jackson hopes it can be convinced to drop the moratorium and go after “marijuana tourism,” billing the area as a destination for people who want to fish, spend time on the rivers or visit nearby Hell’s Canyon – and have a chance to enjoy a recreational drug illegal most other places.

“Tourism is going to go crazy,” he predicted.

The three applicants in Pullman are clustered within a few feet of each other, and less than 7 miles from the Idaho border. But interstate commerce isn’t likely the main concern of proposed stores on Southeast Bishop Boulevard. They’re also less than half a mile from the Stadium Boulevard entrance to Washington State University. Underclassmen take note: The law requires customers to be at least 21, and for the stores to check IDs.

In the Spokane area, applicants making it through the lottery process are heavily concentrated on North Division Street as well as East Trent and East Sprague avenues.

The city of Spokane is allotted eight stores, and all but one selected in the lottery are north of Interstate 90. Four are on North Division Street, two on East Francis Avenue and one on North Ralph Street. One applicant just south of I-90 is on South Lewis Street.

All three Spokane Valley stores would be on East Sprague, with two of them listing the same address on the 9800 block. The rest of the county has seven possible locations, with two more on East Trent in Millwood as well as the three in Newman Lake. Another is on North Division beyond the city limits, and the seventh is on North Hawthorne Street.

Carpenter, the liquor board spokesman, said in cases where the same address is held by two applicants, a landlord could decide which one he or she wanted for a tenant, and the other applicant would be able to find a new location – possibly in one of the locations of would-be retailers who weren’t drawn in the lottery – and open there.

http://www.spokesman.com/stories/2014/may/03/pot-entrepreneurs-like-sites-near-border/

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SFGate, Updated 4:09 pm, Saturday, May 3, 2014

SPOKANE, Wash. (AP) — Eastern Washington legal marijuana entrepreneurs said they hope Idaho residents cross the border to get the drug and that some border cities lift moratoriums on pot shops.

Several of the licenses awarded for pot shops through a lottery this week are near the border with the Gem State, which has not legalized marijuana for recreational purposes, The Spokesman Review reported Saturday (http://bit.ly/RbRJJ9 ).

Washington’s Liquor Control Board on Friday released the results of its lotteries for retail marijuana licenses, setting out who gets first crack at securing one of the coveted documents and opening the state’s first recreational pot shops this summer.

In 75 cities and counties across the state, there were more applicants for retail licenses than stores allotted. The board held lotteries last month to determine who among those 1,174 applicants had the first chance at winning a license. A favorable rank in the lottery doesn’t guarantee a license. Applicants still must pass a background check and financial investigation and meet other requirements before any licenses are issued.

Any of the applicants could drop out or switch to a different location without losing their slot, said Mikhail Carpenter, a spokesman for the liquor board.

Three Spokane County applicants receiving the green light by the Liquor Control Board to finish the licensing process plan to open a store in Newman Lake, just a mile and a half from the border with Idaho.

Manpreet Singh of Hi-Star Corp., who wants to open one of those stores, said he picked the small shopping area in Newman Lake for two reasons. One is he owns a gas station nearby.

The other? “It’s close to the border,” Singh said. That could mean an expanded customer base from Idaho, he said.

Singh said having three marijuana stores in the same area might be tough for business. He has scoped out another spot in the Spokane Valley, but it’s not as good, he said. Among other things, it’s at least 15 miles from the border, Singh said.

Other shop licenses are in Clarkston and Newport. But those cities have placed moratoriums on marijuana businesses.

Joseph Rammell received the OK to proceed with his application to open Mary Jane‘s Weed in Newport. It would be less than 1,000 feet from Oldtown, Idaho, a short walk along residential streets. But the store will open only if Newport drops its moratorium on marijuana businesses within its city limits. If not, “we’re looking at a couple of alternate locations” outside of town, he said.

Kelly Jackson, who got a permit to open a shop in Clarkston, said he hopes a tourism pitch will convince city leaders to lift the moratorium.

“Tourism is going to go crazy,” he predicted.

Jackson hopes it can be convinced to drop the moratorium and go after “marijuana tourism,” billing the area as a destination for people who want to fish, spend time on the rivers or visit nearby Hell’s Canyon – and have a chance to enjoy a recreational drug illegal most other places.

http://www.sfgate.com/default/article/Washington-pot-shop-owners-eye-Idaho-business-5451021.php